Teaching On The Pulse

Welcome to the Wabash Center's blog series:
Teaching On The Pulse

This monthly blog provides updates on the Wabash Center’s doings and happenings. As well, it is a space where Lynne shares her insights, commentary, and opinion on issues of teaching, learning, and justice in theology and religion.  This blog is meant to be evocative, even provocative. You are welcome to use her blog entries to spark dialogue in your classrooms, among your faculty and with your administrators. 

 

 

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Recent Posts

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In the late 1970s, the summer day camp hosted by my church was filled with children grades 1 to 6. The counselors, including me and my best friend Michele, were high school aged people. I taught Nature Studies and Michele taught Spanish. Along with these two subjects, the campers also took classes ...

What happens at the Wabash Center is not meant to stay at Wabash. This is not a statement about confidentiality nor about alleged indiscretions. By design, the unambiguous gift of the Wabash Center to faculty colleagues in religion and theology remains conversations to support the life of teaching. Our workshops, ...

Before the quarantine caused seismic interruptions, a cloistered education was deemed by many as the better education. This longstanding approach to education meant that the student would sequester from the world, study undisturbed from the goings-on of the world, to then emerge and return to the world as a learned ...

Have you ever asked a question in class for which you did not know the answer; a question for which you did not have THE one answer in mind? Have you ever planned an assignment or designed a learning activity that was so freewheeling that you did not know what ...

The narration below is my recollection of a typical interchange between my mother and my father when I was a child. Be mindful that we lived in a large home and invariably during these conversations my father would be on the first floor and my mother would be on the ...

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