Grants

Wabash Center Grant Program

The Wabash Center provides funds for projects that enhance teaching and learning in the fields of religion and theological studies as taught in colleges, universities, and theological schools. Routinely, we fund projects that focus on:  improving teaching and learning practices in and beyond the classroom; nurturing supportive environments for teachers; nurturing supportive teaching environments for learners; strengthening student learning; connecting the classroom to the wider society.

The Wabash Center understands its grant projects as learning processes. A grant proposal will need to support projects, initiatives, programs, and design moments of exploration, discovery, learning, and response for those participating in the grant project. The project director should think of the presenting pedagogical issue as that which needs investigation, exploration and interrogation, and the activities of the grant project as the means by which this exploration is satisfied.

In 2022, funding of Large Grant proposals up to $30,000 with these foci will be prioritized:

#1  Creativity & Imagination for Innovation in Crisis

#2  Learner-Centered Pedagogies for Racially/Ethnically/Culturally Diverse Student Bodies

For additional information about grant proposals up to $30,000, see: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu/wabash-grants/project-grants/

 

In 2022, funding of Small Grant proposals up to $5,000 include:

Small Grants up to $5,000 with these foci will be prioritized:

#1  Creativity & Imagination for Innovation in Crisis

#2  Learner-Centered Pedagogies for Racially/Ethnically/Culturally Diverse Student Bodies

For additional information about small grant proposals up to $5,000, see: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu/wabash-grants/small-project-grants/

 

In 2022, Peer Mentoring Clusters Grants proposals up to $7,500

Deadline for Proposals is March 24, 2022.

The 2022-23 Cluster Leaders’ Meeting is to be determined.

The Wabash Center funds up to 10 grants each year to support small groups for peer-to-peer mentoring. These are designated for mid-career faculty of color who have been participants in a past Wabash Center workshops or colloquies, and are intended to support the development of multi-year relationships with a small group of colleagues. 

Minoritized faculty face particular challenges and pressures and can benefit from networks of peer-to-peer mentoring. Peer mentoring conversations can surface ways to meet the demands of mid-career teaching and administrative responsibilities. They can also provide faculty of color with strategies not only to discern challenges and pressures, but to navigate them as well.

For more information about Peer Mentoring Clusters Grants, see: https://www.wabashcenter.wabash.edu/wabash-grants/peer-mentoring/

 

Activities NOT Funded

The Wabash Center generally does not fund:

  • International travel for research
  • Travel for attendance at disciplinary conferences
  • The preparation of textbooks
  • Research focused primarily on field content and only secondarily on teaching
  • Publication of conference papers or books, or production costs of other media

Put most bluntly, the Wabash Center does not underwrite the ordinary, ongoing work of the professorate, much of which is already supported by the home institution or departments.

Wabash Center Mission

Grant Coaching

We strongly encourage you to be in conversation with us as you develop ideas for a grant project and write a formal proposal. We will gladly give you feedback on your ideas and on a draft proposal in a timely manner.

Contact:
Dr. Paul O. Myhre
Senior Associate Director, Wabash Center
myhrep@wabash.edu
(800) 655-7117


General Eligibility Requirements

The Wabash Center gives grants to accredited universities, colleges, or seminaries in the United States and Canada and occasionally to non-profit organizations providing services to improve teaching and learning at institutions of higher education. The project director will ordinarily be a full-time faculty member in religion or theology. In colleges or universities without a department of religion or theology, we will consider, on a case-by-case basis, project directors from other departments whose primary teaching responsibility is in the area of religion.

Wabash Center