Praxis: The Responsive and Expanding Classroom

Welcome to the Wabash Center's blog series: Praxis: The Responsive and Expanding Classroom

Blog/vlog writers will address such questions as:

  • How does one pivot from teaching in a face-to-face classroom to teaching in a fully online classroom environment?
  • What issues arise in online classrooms during periods of national and global crisis and how might teachers handle them?
  • What has been learned about my students through teaching during crisis and how has this helped me to better meet their learning needs?
  • What are important considerations when designing courses and teaching in relation to questions of teaching during periods of crisis?

Instructions for blog writers and vlog makers: 

Sign-up to receive email alerts when new blogs are posted

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook to receive announcements of new postings.

Sign up for our eNewsletter to receive timely announcements of Wabash Center programs.

Recent Posts

Select an item by clicking its checkbox

One of our most time-consuming and dreaded tasks as humanities faculty is grading student papers. We’re making it worse by writing too many comments. Some of my colleagues correct every single grammatical error. Others fill the margins with thoughtful suggestions, noting all the misunderstandings of the text, the lapses ...

When I began my first full-time professor gig in 2008, I quickly learned to be fiercely protective of my own time. I understood that the long game of an academic career necessitated the publication of my first book. I loved teaching, but I intentionally restricted my own preparation and grading time ...

For the past twelve months, I have made several pivots in my teaching to meet what Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. identified in his 1967 speech on the war in Vietnam at The Riverside Church in New York City as “the fierce urgency of now.” Dr. King began by affirming the ...

Twenty-five springs ago I sat in a class on African American literature. On a small, rural midwestern campus, this course was taught by a white professor. Two of the seven Black students on campus at that time were in the class, the remaining twenty-five or so students reflected the demographics ...

I am often asked some version of the following question: “How has it been teaching online now?” For those of us who teach at schools with in-person learning, I imagine this is a common query from friends, family members, and colleagues. Initially, I gave answers that highlighted the sensations of ...

Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!